Your source for eye health education

At Viteyes, we are committed to providing you with the latest educational information about your eyes and the vitamins that impact eye health.

Our eyes age as we do

Like any other part of the body, our eyes and sight weaken as we age. At a young age, the lens within the eye is flexible and elastic, it has the ability to react, change size and shape with the help from the muscles that surround it to accommodate images near and far. Yet as we age, the muscle fibers surrounding the lens lose flexibility and stiffen. The ability to focus light and view images properly declines. Eye sight is a way of life, protect yours with the nutrients they need to stay healthy.

Cicilary Body

The cicilary body is the part of the eye that connects the iris to the choroid, a vascular layer that provides nourishment and oxygen. The cicilary muscles within the cicilary body allow for the viewing of objects at varying distances and regulate the flow of fluid (aqueous humor) throughout the eye. Without proper nutrition, eye pressure increases preventing the cicilary muscles from regulating the flow of liquid resulting in build up of liquids that can cause glaucoma.

CORNEA

The cornea is the clear film that covers the pupil and the iris. It provides the eye the ability to focus light in order to see objects within your line of sight. The cornea is comprised of 5 layers, each of which have their own specialized functions. As the outer layer, the cornea is vulnerable to infections and scratches that can affect sight.

Cicilary Body

The cicilary body is the part of the eye that connects the iris to the choroid, a vascular layer that provides nourishment and oxygen. The cicilary muscles within the cicilary body allow for the viewing of objects at varying distances and regulate the flow of fluid (aqueous humor) throughout the eye. Without proper nutrition, eye pressure increases preventing the cicilary muscles from regulating the flow of liquid resulting in build up of liquids that can cause glaucoma.

CORNEA

The cornea is the clear film that covers the pupil and the iris. It provides the eye the ability to focus light in order to see objects within your line of sight. The cornea is comprised of 5 layers, each of which have their own specialized functions. As the outer layer, the cornea is vulnerable to infections and scratches that can affect sight.

IRIS

The iris is what gives individuals their distinctive eye color. The iris is made up of tissue called the stroma. The stroma connects to the muscles that allow the pupils to dilate and contract. The iris is surrounded by the sclera which is the large amount of visible white space. Although developing a disease of the iris is rare, healthy diets that affect intraocular pressure can help to prevent diseases that indirectly affect the iris.

PUPIL

The opening in the center of the iris, the pupil allows light to enter the eye where it is then focused on to the retina and the process of sight begins. The pupil appears black due to the amount of light that the tissue absorbs as it passes through. As we age, the muscles working within the pupil can weaken making it harder to see at night since the muscles within the pupil have difficulty dilating (expanding) and constricting (shrinking). Maintaining a balanced diet can help assure that these muscles do not weaken.

LENS

The lens is a transparent structure directly behind the iris and the pupil. It has the ability to curve inward and outward as well as change shape and size. Similar to the cornea, it refracts light and focuses images on to the retina. As we age, the proteins within our eyes begin to clump and create a clouded area otherwise known as a cataract. Refraining from smoking and maintaining a healthy weight can help to reduce the possibility of cataracts.

Retina

The retina is a multi-layered structure covering the back surface of the eye housing rods, cones and blood vessels. A light sensitive layer towards the back of the eye, the retina is responsible for converting light energy into signals that are carried to the brain where they are understood as shapes, movement and colors. Maintaining a healthy diet can decrease the risk of diabetic retinopathy and other diseases that can be passed down through genetic dispositions.

OPTIC NERVE

The optic nerve is a cable-like grouping of nerve fibers that are responsible for connecting the eye to the brain. The optic nerve carries impulses/messages from the retina to the brain where they are then interpreted as visual messages. Damage to the optic nerve usually results in glaucoma, a disease that increases pressure in the eye leading to blindness.

Retina

The retina is a multi-layered structure covering the back surface of the eye housing rods, cones and blood vessels. A light sensitive layer towards the back of the eye, the retina is responsible for converting light energy into signals that are carried to the brain where they are understood as shapes, movement and colors. Maintaining a healthy diet can decrease the risk of diabetic retinopathy and other diseases that can be passed down through genetic dispositions.

OPTIC NERVE

The optic nerve is a cable-like grouping of nerve fibers that are responsible for connecting the eye to the brain. The optic nerve carries impulses/messages from the retina to the brain where they are then interpreted as visual messages. Damage to the optic nerve usually results in glaucoma, a disease that increases pressure in the eye leading to blindness.

MACULA

A small area in the center of the retina, the macula is responsible for enabling us to see directly in front of us and is the center of our field of vision. The macula gives us the ability to do detailed activities such as reading and writing. As we age, blood flow to the macula decreases which can cause conditions such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and macular edema (diabetic patients). Maintaining or implementing a healthy diet and exercise routine can help prevent further damage to the macula.

FOOD FOR SIGHT

Just as a healthy diet is essential for general wellness, nutrition also impacts our eyes. The foods we eat are packed with the nutrients our eyes need to protect them from unwanted eye conditions. Achieving a balanced diet of carbohydrates, fruits and vegetables, proteins, starches and fats, as well as exercise and smoking cessation are just some ways to support healthy eyes.

VITAMIN E

  • Vitamin E

    Part of the cell membrane, Vitamin E helps the eye shield itself from free radicals in the eye’s normal aging process. It neutralizes oxidation in the body and protects certain parts of the eye, which can be susceptible to oxidation. Natural Vitamin E, found in Classic Advanced, has better bioavailability for your eyes than synthetic Vitamin E. Vitamin E is commonly found in avocados, sunflower seeds, almonds, spinach, peanuts and olive oil.

VITAMIN C

  • Vitamin C

    A powerful antioxidant, Vitamin C helps the eye shield itself from free radicals in the eye’s normal aging process. Vitamin C, a water-soluble nutrient, aids the body in forming and maintaining connective tissue, including collagen found in the cornea of the eye. Vitamin C is also required by nerve cells in the eye to function properly. Vitamin C is commonly found in oranges, kiwis, green peppers, papaya, broccoli and kale.

ZEAXANTHIN

  • ZEAXANTHIN

    Although naturally occurring in the body, the body is not able to reproduce Zeaxanthin. It is an important carotenoid that helps to maintain macular and retinal health, protecting the eye from damaging UV light. Zeaxanthin is commonly found in peppers, kale, basil, broccoli, brussel sprouts and asparagus.

COPPER

  • Copper

    Copper is added to all eye products that also contain Zinc in order to prevent copper-deficiency anemia, which can occur if large amounts of zinc are consumed. It is known to aid in the development of the flexible connective tissue needed for proper eye structure. Copper is commonly found in sunflower seeds, beef, liver, cashews, ark chocolate, lentils and avocado.

LUTEIN

  • LUTEIN

    Lutein is a powerful antioxidant that exists inside the body and helps to protect and maintain healthy cells within the eye. It is also able to absorb blue light and help protect the eye against damaging light. Lutein is extremely important in maintaining macular and retinal health, as this carotenoid is found to be highly concentrated in the macula. Lutein is commonly found in kale, spinach, collard greens, broccoli and eggs.

ZINC

  • ZINC

    Zinc is an essential trace mineral. It helps bring Vitamin A from the liver to the retina in order to produce melanin, a protective pigment in the eye. High production of melanin also supports overall health. Zinc is commonly found is broccoli, beef, chicken liver, eggs, tuna, dark turkey meat, oysters, and whole grains.

BILBERRY EXTRACT

  • Bilberry Extract

    Fortifying blood-vessel walls, bilberry fruit standardized extract helps to improve blood flow and improve oxygen delivery in the eye. The extract contains powerful antioxidants, which benefit the eyes and the circulatory system. Bilberry fruit standardized extract is found in bilberries a relative of the blueberry family.

GRAPE SEED EXTRACT

  • Grape Seed Extract

    A bioflavonoid and potent antioxidant, grape seed standardized extract helps to protect against oxidative damage and aids in the proper circulation of blood flow to the eye. It also supports the retina and blood vessels, which helps support visual acuity. Grape seed extract is found in grapes.

ALPHA-LIPOIC ACID

  • ALPHA-LIPOIC ACID

    Alpha-lipoic acid is a powerful antioxidant that is both water and fat-soluble, which allows it to move into all parts of the cell to neutralize free radicals. Alpha-lipoic acid also helps to regenerate glutathione, giving cells a double dose of antioxidant protection. Alpha-lipoic acid is commonly found in carrots, spinach, broccoli, tomatoes, green peas and brussel sprouts.

BORAGE SEED

  • BORAGE SEED

    A natural substance, similar to flaxseed oil, borage seed oil provides high levels of essential fatty acids that our bodies need. Borage helps the body produce oils that can help to reduce redness and discomfort associated with dry eye. Derived from the borage plant.

OMEGA-3

  • OMEGA-3

    The fatty acids available in Omega-3 are essential to our health. Our bodies cannot produce some of the essential fatty acids (EFAs) we need. Omega-3 has been proven to benefit eye health and studies suggest that it may help to protect adult eyes from macular degeneration and dry eye. Omega-3 is commonly found in salmon, mackerel, shrimp, crab, halibut, sardines and flax oil.

SELENIUM

  • SELENIUM

    Selenium is a component of an enzyme found in the powerful antioxidant L-Glautathione. Once in the body, Selenium helps fight free radicals in the eye from normal exposure to UV light. It is also essential to helping the body absorb Vitamin E. Selenium is commonly found in mushrooms, eggs, spinach, chicken, oats and salmon.

GINGKO BILOBA

  • GINGKO BILOBA

    Containing special plant nutrients and no known pathogens, Ginkgo Biloba can increase blood flow to the eyes and body and alleviate intraocular eye pressure. Gingko Biloba also aids in combating eye diseases such as glaucoma and cataracts by promoting antioxidation.

VITAMIN B6

  • VITAMIN B6

    Along with supporting heart health and brain function, Vitamin B6 contributes to overall eye health. By carrying oxygen throughout the body and absorbing magnesium, Vitamin B6 enables tear production and helps reduce the risk of age-related eye issues.

TURMERIC

  • TURMERIC

    Known for its inflammatory properties, turmeric contains curicumin an effective antioxidant that alleviates oxidative stress that contributes to common eye disease progression such as glaucoma, macular degeneration and cataracts.

CO-Q10

  • CO-Q10

    A naturally occurring enzyme, CoQ-10 converts the foods we eat into energy for our bodies and eyes. CoQ-10 protects the mitochondria and other cells in the retina. CoQ-10 replenishes eyes and supports macular health. CoQ-10 is commonly found in spinach, broccoli, legumes, beef and mackerel.

FLAXSEED

  • FLAXSEED

    Flaxseed is a source of fatty acid that contains high levels of omega-3. Flaxseed oil is broken down in the body and converted into EPA and DHA, two compounds that are beneficial to eye health and can reduce the effects of dry eye by increasing and locking in moisture. Derived from flax seeds.

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